Upcoming events and opportunities

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Dear Friends of SJS,
Here are some great upcoming events and opportunities:
MARCH 6:
IDEAFEST: 
Angry populism: Understanding the new politics of anxiety and xenophobia 
7–9 P.M. | ENGINEERING/COMPUTER SCIENCE BUILDING (ECS) RM 123 
Across the world there’s a renewal of ‘angry populism,’ where large numbers of people are feeling abandoned by their political and economic leaders and turning to demagogues and xenophobia. What accounts for this return to the worst of our past? UVic scholars offer historical perspectives on the contemporary surge of support for Trumpism, Brexit and antiimmigration parties in Europe, looking at historical precedent and highlighting the sources of reactionary populism’s contempt for the political establishment
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March 7:

This is a reminder of the Scotty Neish Communist Education Session. At the March meeting, we will discuss International Women's Day and read some Socialist and Communist literature.

Material to Discuss:

...

Women's Suffrage and Class Struggle by Rosa Luxemburg,

International Women's Day by Alexandra Kollontai,

Soviet Power and the Status of Women by Lenin.

Location: UVic SUB - B025.
Date: 7:00 pm, 7 March 2017.

Mazin al-Nahawi,
Lekwungen/Saanich Territory Club,
CPC-BC.

Tyson Strandlund,
YCL - Victoria.

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MARCH 7: IDEAFEST

On being here to stay, together

5:30–7:30 P.M. | BOB WRIGHT CENTRE (BWC) B150 

Reconciling a regrettable colonial past with a respectful future is a challenge and an opportunity for governments and peoples around the world. As we celebrate Canada’s 150th, how do we reconcile the past and participate in an inclusive and diverse future? Join us for a conversation on the impact of universal aspirations for the rights of Indigenous peoples and of national calls for reconciliation. What can we do as individuals and within our communities to support these goals? 


Reconciliation and resurgence: How Indigenous artists are re-imagining the story of Canada

 7–9 P.M. | ALIX GOOLDEN HALL, 907 PANDORA AVE 

Join university chancellor and celebrated broadcast journalist Shelagh Rogers for an intimate conversation with Indigenous visual artists Rande Cook and Carey Newman and UVic visual anthropologist Andrea Walsh. Across Canada, contemporary Indigenous artists are using images to explore place, truth and identity and challenging us to transform our perspectives, conversations and ideas. Collectively, this great imagining is playing a unique and pivotal role in understanding our past and determining our shared future. Free admission, registration required: uvic.ca/ideafest/register

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MARCH 8: CANCELLED: 


International Women's Day Film Screening and Panel Discussion Cancelled

To celebrate International Women’s Day, the African Awareness Committee is screening Honor Diaries on March 8th(Wed) at 7 pm in Fisher 100 (Lansdowne Campus).  Honor Diaries features women’s rights advocates in identifying and addressing the systematic abuses of Muslim women in freedom of movement, the right to education, forced marriage, and female genital mutilation.  A panel discussion will follow the film show.  

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March 8:


Workers' Wednesday: Gender and Power


On Wednesday, March 8 we will be hosting an extra-special Worker's Wednesday in solidarity with the International Women's Day. The evening will include some hangout time (drink specials included), screening of Dish: Women, Waitressing & the Art of Service (trailer here) and facilitated group discussion. More information is available on Facebook

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MARCH 8 IDEAFEST:

Living research: Stories from the field 

2:30–4:30 P.M. | DAVID STRONG BUILDING (DSB) C118 

Discover how UVic is connected to the world through studentled research in partnership with migrant and refugee rights organizations in India, Bangladesh, Singapore, South Africa and Malaysia. Students will share experiences from diverse projects including: a phone app to learn Bangla, a cookbook-storybook from India, a digital resource library, a curriculum development project for refugee youth, and a digital collage showcasing the lives of rickshaw wallahs. Come and learn about the power of community-based research and what happens when students get out of the classroom and into the field. 

Re-presenting the living landscape: The common ground community mapping fair 

3–6 P.M. | DAVID TURPIN BUILDING (DTB) B211/215 

How does mapping Indigenous place names relate to ecocultural restoration and contribute to gathering stories about place? Join us for a celebration and showcase of local and global community mapping, place-making and story gathering, supported by the UVic Community Mapping Collaboratory. Hear from neighbourhood and campus mappers, students, researchers and activists. Play a community mapping game and share your story on the UVic and CRD Community Green Map community platforms


Why art matters in dangerous times 

5–7 P.M. | MCPHERSON LIBRARY (LIB) 025

This lively panel argues that at a time when xenophobia, ethnocentrism, political tensions, and censorship are on the rise, art and the visual—from the meme to the masterpiece—have more to offer society than ever before in human history. This panel event accompanies the exhibition Learning through looking: Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Department of Art History & Visual Studies.


Brave spirits on new paths: The road to Indigenous economic reconciliation 

7–9 P.M. | ALIX GOOLDEN HALL, 907 PANDORA AVE 

What are the bold steps for all Canadians towards Indigenous economic reconciliation? In this session, UVic professors John Borrows and Brent Mainprize will offer insight from their research into this subject, before Ovide Mercredi (past National Chief, Assembly of First Nations), Guujaaw (former Haida leader), and David Suzuki (renowned author and environmentalist) share their personal perspectives and expertise in a stimulating panel discussion. From sustainable development to the legal and political framework of Indigenous economic reconciliation, the event will explore topics relevant to all Canadians. A moderated Q&A with the audience will follow the presentation.

Ecology of a changing coast 

7–9 P.M. | MACLAURIN BUILDING (MAC) A144, DAVID LAM AUDITORIUM 

The BC coastal region—from the Salish Sea to the Great Bear Rainforest and the Haida Gwaii archipelago—is home to some of the richest biodiversity on Earth. Fish, bears, wolves, whales, migratory birds and botanical species, among others, flourish here. And for millennia First Nations have flourished alongside them. Yet today, the effects of climate change, overharvesting and development are impacting this fine balance. Three researchers at the forefront of their fields discuss their research on the changing ecology of the BC coast and their efforts to minimize these threats, working with local communities and government. 

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MARCH 10 IDEAFEST:

Old school lessons: Indigenous ways of teaching and learning 

10:30 A.M.–12 P.M. | FIRST PEOPLES HOUSE (FPH) CEREMONIAL HALL

Join us at this interactive session where we’ll describe the ways in which we’ve learned from elders, community members and from our teacher who has integrated Aboriginal ways of knowing and being into our work. We’ve been working and learning at the Craigflower School House in a multi-aged context where we interact, cooperate and learn from each other in this beautiful setting, recently designated a National Historic Site. Whether you’re a parent, a teacher, an educator, or an interested member of the public, we hope to inspire you to build together a shared future of respectful relationships. 


Engaging in stories of Indigenous well-being 

1–3 P.M. | FIRST PEOPLES HOUSE (FPH) CEREMONIAL HALL 

Indigenous-led research and Indigenous methodologies demonstrate a holistic nature that vastly differs from western concepts of research. In this Pecha Kucha-style presentation, UVic public health researcher Charlotte Loppie will briefly explain some key components of Indigenous research methods before turning the stage over to students, researchers and affiliates of UVic’s Centre for Indigenous Research and Community-Led Engagement (CIRCLE). Presenters will speak on the interdisciplinary frameworks they have undertaken to understand Indigenous well-being, from language revitalization to the importance of Indigenous networks within HIV/AIDS interventions. 


Migrating People 

2:30–3:50 P.M. | DAVID TURPIN BUILDING (DTB) A120 

One of the most pressing issues the world currently faces is the movement of people across borders. This isn’t just a political issue—it involves social justice, morality, the impacts of gender, age and religion, and personal well-being. Come and listen to a moderated panel discussion between humanists as they unravel some of the complexities of global migration, including forced migration, and explain how their research and teaching responds to it.


Re-imagining race, art and landscape 

7–9 P.M. | LEGACY ART GALLERY DOWNTOWN, 630 YATES ST 

How do artists of colour experience race and identity? Grafton Tyler Brown was one of the first professional landscape artists in BC, and the story of his racial identity shifted throughout his career to where he eventually passed for white. Three contemporary artists of colour—Charles Campbell, Kemi Craig and Victoria’s youth poet laureate Ann-Bernice Thomas—will perform new work relating to racial identity in response to the UVic Legacy Gallery exhibition, The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown.


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MARCH 11 IDEAFEST:

The Anthropocene is here! Living well in a ‘One Planet’ region 

1:30–4:30 P.M. | JAMES BAY NEW HORIZONS ACTIVITY CENTRE, 234 MENZIES ST 

As we enter the Anthropocene, we face the challenge of living within the Earth’s limits. Currently, our ecological footprint requires four planets-worth of bio-capacity. How do we reduce our footprint to only one planet-worth, while ensuring a high quality of life for all? In this roundtable discussion, community and university speakers will explore with the audience what steps we can take in Greater Victoria to become a ‘One Planet’ region.

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MARCH 13:

Seeking A Skilled Leadership Facilitator - Expressions of Interest due March 13

The South Vancouver Island Chapter of the BC Council for International Cooperation (BCCIC-SOVI) is currently seeking a skilled facilitator to lead a Visioning and Teambuilding Session scheduled for Saturday, March 25th (10 am to 4 pm).   Attached please find an overview of our request for expressions of interest. 

 

Submissions should be forwarded by email to April Ingham, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.no later than 9:00 am, Monday  March 13th. Please ensure you include “Expression of Interest – 2017 Visioning and Teambuilding” in the subject line.

 

Thank you,

 

April

 

April Ingham

Executive Director

Pacific Peoples' Partnership

Suite 407, 620 View Street

Victoria, BC  V8W 1J6

Ph. 250-381-4131

www.pacificpeoplespartnership.org

We are situated guests on unceded

Lekwungen Coast Salish Traditional Territories

 

PPP is a proud member of the Canadian Council for International Co-operation , SOVI and BCCIC


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MARCH 16:


Unist'ot'en Camp Benefit Concert


On Thursday, March 16th, please join us at Alix Goolden Hall (907 Pandora) for an Unist'ot'en Camp benefit concert. Doors open at 7PM, event begins at 7:30, and runs until 10PM.

 

BACKGROUND

 

The Unist'ot'en have sustained an unbroken relationship with their territory for thousands of years and have continued to practice their traditions in spite of intense and ongoing colonial encroachment. Today those practices include harvesting food and medicine from their territory, building a Healing Centre to address impacts of colonialism, and running many camps and workshops to share skills and knowledge. They are also currently resisting, among others, the Pacific Trails Pipelines and Coastal GasLink project, which are intended to transport fracked gas from Treaty 8 territory to LNG plants on the west coast. Learn more about the Unist'ot’en Camp at http://unistoten.camp or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/unistoten/.

 

THE BENEFIT CONCERT

 

The event will begin with a welcoming from Esquimalt and Songhees First Nation representatives, and a presentation from the Unist'ot'en hereditary Chiefs and Camp spokesperson Freda Huson. We will then start the music and enjoy performances by Natu Bearwolf, Betty Supple, Zoubi Arros, Rae Spoon and Compassion Gorilla.

 

Tickets are by donation, from $15-$20 (no one turned away for lack of funds), and can be purchased at the door or in advance - online at https://www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/1442697?utm_medium=bks or in person at Wildfire Bakery or Camas Books.

 

We would like to acknowledge the time that many people in our community are donating to put on this event - from postering and hosting to playing music and raising funds - and would humbly request your help in spreading the word about this benefit concert. It would be thrilling to us to pack Alix Goolden Hall and show the Unist'ot'en that people here support their courageous and important resistance. Thank you!

 

For information about event accessibility, and performer bios, please visit:

https://stopthepipelinesstartthemusic.wordpress.com/

 

For FB event page, visit:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1349729311714744/

 

CONTACT ORGANIZERS

 

If you have any questions or concerns about this event, please send an e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. In the interests of accountability and transparency, this event is being coordinated by volunteers Anna Gerrard, Seb Bonet, Colton Hash, Chris Fretwell, and Joshua Goldberg, with support towards the event from OUST, SocialCoast, UVic Social Justice Studies, the UVic Sustainability Project, private donors, and many community volunteers helping make the event possible.

 

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March 21:



FILM: THE WANTED 18


An animated documentary film by Amer Shomali and Paul Cowan

about 18 reluctant cows that were declared "a threat to the State of Israel" and became symbols of the First Intifada.


Tuesday, March 21, 2017 

7:00 pm

UVic David Strong Bldg, C118

Admission by donation.  Proceeds to plant olive trees in Palestine.

Discussion to follow the film.

 

If 18 cows can be a security threat to the state of Israel, where does it end?

Amer Shomali, the Palestinian film-maker, observes-

"Nowadays we are struck in a matrix where we can't decide anything.  We are not allowed to dig for water under Palestinian cities.  We have to buy it from an Israeli company.  It's quite bizarre, the way we are living.  We don't control borders, we don't control water, we don't control electricity.  We can't import stuff.  We can't export stuff.  It's like a big prison."

In other words, it never ends...

 

Sponsored by

International Jewish Voices Victoria

KAIROS Victoria

Social Justice Studies(UVic)

https://www.facebook.com/events/1744924185822484/

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Margo MatwychukDirector
Social Justice Studies ProgramUniversity of Victoriaweb.uvic.ca/socialjustice/@UVicSJS on TwitterUVicSJS on FacebookUVicSJS on YouTube
We acknowledge and respect the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSÁNEĆ peoples on whose traditional territory the university stands and whose relationships with the land continue to this day.

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